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Demand growing for KidsHelpline@School

Posted on 23 October 2015
Demand growing for KidsHelpline@School

Primary school teachers across Australia are increasingly turning to the award-winning Kids Helpline@ School program to help students cope with common problems like peer pressure and cyber bullying.

In 2015 alone, over 11 thousand students have been able to access the free early intervention program which brings trained counsellors into primary school classrooms via a video link or telephone.

Kids Helpline General Manager Wendy Protheroe says the lessons cover topics that are directly linked to the primary health curriculum.

"Each session is written as a lesson plan and so it is very clearly structured", Ms Protheroe explains.

"If one of the students raises concerns over their own personal health, we can then follow that up with the student later in a private counselling session", she adds.

Other topics covered during the classroom sessions include managing the transition to high school, coping with anxiety and handling arguments at home.

The program recently received a major award through the National Association for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect during National Child Protection Week.

Ms Protheroe says it is a highly practical program, geared to meet the everyday needs of students.

"I watched a really successful session recently that was based around online stranger danger", she explains.

KidsHelpline says it hopes to expand the program to cover secondary students as well and Ms Protheroe says the organisation is looking towards sponsorship to cover the costs of that.

"There is a lot of demand from teachers in the Years 7-9 age groups for a service like this, especially in one of our topic areas of school leadership", she says.

Primary schools can find more information and book counselling sessions via the Kids Helpline website- www.kidshelp.com.au/school

Tags: Schools
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